Compare and Contrast Essay: Falling in Love

Hello! I have to write a compare and contrast essay on the way falling in love is described in Austen’s excerpt and in the scene from the movie. Listen also to the original version of the song played by the character and use it, if you see fit.

Guidelines:
Use concrete, specific examples to support your composition.

Write a 4 paragraph (minimum) essay with an introduction paragraph (ending with a thesis statement), two body paragraphs, and a conclusion paragraph (not a repetition of the thesis).

Remember, comparing is pointing out how two things are similar while contrasting is to stress their differences. In this paper, you will need to accomplish both objectives, finding logical bases of comparison and contrast, and determining their merit.

Structure: When writing, make sure you use either block organization or point-by-point organization, and use appropriate transitions to signal your next move to the reader. Make sure you have clear topic sentences, followed by cohesive supporting sentences that demonstrate unity.

Expressions indicating comparison: also, as well as, bears resemblance to both, and in common with, in like manner, like, likewise, neither nor, similar, too

Expressions indicating contrast: although this may be true, at the same time, but, for all that, however, in contrast to, in opposition to, nevertheless, on the one handon the other hand, still, otherwise, unlike, whereas, yet

From Sense and Sensibility, Jane Austen, 1811:
“In the evening, as Marianne was discovered to be musical, she was invited to play. The instrument was unlocked, every body prepared to be charmed, and Marianne, who sang very well, at their request went through the chief of the songs which Lady Middleton had brought into the family on her marriage, and which perhaps had lain ever since in the same position on the pianoforte, for her ladyship had celebrated that event by giving up music, although by her mother’s account, she had played extremely well, and by her own was very fond of it.

Marianne’s performance was highly applauded. Sir John was loud in his admiration at the end of every song, and as loud in his conversation with the others while every song lasted. Lady Middleton frequently called him to order, wondered how any one’s attention could be diverted from music for a moment, and asked Marianne to sing a particular song which Marianne had just finished. Colonel Brandon alone, of all the party, heard her without being in raptures. He paid her only the compliment of attention; and she felt a respect for him on the occasion, which the others had reasonably forfeited by their shameless want of taste. His pleasure in music, though it amounted not to that ecstatic delight which alone could sympathize with her own, was estimable when contrasted against the horrible insensibility of the others; and she was reasonable enough to allow that a man of five and thirty might well have outlived all acuteness of feeling and every exquisite power of enjoyment. She was perfectly disposed to make every allowance for the colonel’s advanced state of life which humanity required.

Mrs. Jennings was a widow with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world. In the promotion of this object she was zealously active, as far as her ability reached; and missed no opportunity of projecting weddings among all the young people of her acquaintance. She was remarkably quick in the discovery of attachments, and had enjoyed the advantage of raising the blushes and the vanity of many a young lady by insinuations of her power over such a young man; and this kind of discernment enabled her soon after her arrival at Barton decisively to pronounce that Colonel Brandon was very much in love with Marianne Dashwood.”

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